How to Use Self-Talk to Be Free From Addiction: Introspection Requires Rational and Honest Self-Talk

How to Use Self-Talk to Be Free From Addiction: Introspection Requires Rational and Honest Self-Talk

It is not possible to truly search one’s soul while thinking illogically. All addictive behavior motivates persons to base decisions about their behavior, at the current moment, on emotions and physical sensations. Thought processes for the addict have almost nothing to do with rational and logical thinking about the issue of whether to engage in self-destructive acts. Indulgence in addictive behavior never makes sense.

Rational, Logical, Thought-Provoking Questions For Addicted Persons To Consider

The word “rational” comes from the same Latin root as the word “reason,” which refers to the proper use of the mind. The following is a list of five criteria for evaluating self-talk as it relates to the addictive behavior process. One should examine his or her thoughts and determine whether they are logical and rational, then ask and truthfully answer questions such as the ones that follow.

  1. Is the thought in one’s mind true as it relates to addictive behavior? Will it help the person remain free from his or her problem? If the current thought is not logically, absolutely, and irrefutably true in every conceivable way, it is destructive and should be immediately discarded, absolutely refusing to act on it.
  2. Does any empirical, scientific evidence support the thought in mind? What are the existing, practical, observable evidences one can readily see that authenticate and verify the thought? If it “just feels good” and no hard evidence can be produced to support it, it is destructive and should be immediately discarded, absolutely refusing to act on it.
  3. When one thinks this thought, does it produce the long-lasting feelings one wants in every way to remain with him or her for the rest of a lifetime? Will it bring a calm assurance and a feeling of peace? Or does it cause feelings of apprehension with regard to oneself, or regarding significant others? If it causes apprehension of any kind, it is destructive and should be immediately discarded, absolutely refusing to act on it.
  4. Does the thought that one has in mind help to reach a purposely chosen goal of becoming free in every way from addictive and self-destructive behaviors? If not, it is destructive and should be immediately discarded, absolutely refusing to act on it.
  5. If the thought is acted on, is it likely that it will reduce conflict one might experience with others who are significant in one’s life? If not, it is destructive should be immediately discarded, absolutely refusing to act on it.

Everyone Who Has Become Free from Addiction Learned to Think Logically and Rationally

Becoming free from addiction and self-destructive behavior inevitably requires one to be cold-hard logical in every thought and detail about the matter. Until one is courageous enough to accept this truth, he or she will never be free from the addictive process, unless something truly magical happens. Addicts are notorious for refusing to consider facts regarding addictions and the addictive process.

Sufferers from addiction persist in seeing themselves as the exception to the rule. Things will somehow be different for them than for everybody else. They think like people who buy one hundred lottery tickets then claim they have guaranteed themselves a jackpot. Unless individuals can train themselves to think logically and rationally, they will probably never be free from the problem that has plagued them more than anything else in their lives.

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